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We just appointed our new Chief Scientist and she is one 'super woman'

When Dr Cathy Foley isn't conducting ground-breaking research on super conductors she's spreading the word of STEM careers and their vitality for Australia. And now she's our Chief Scientist!

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Interronauts: The CSIRO podcast

Ep 19: Killer T: immunotherapy returns, hydrogen at the bowser, ancient cheese and vego sharks

Kate, Gavin, and Jesse talk about a new treatment for pancreatic cancer using killer cells, our new vehicles powered not on gasoline but hydrogen, and a science news digest about the oldest cheese, neutron stars, omnivorous sharks, and moooore.

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Video

[Music plays and animation images move through of a factory, two windmills, solar panels on a house roof, a battery, a hydrogen molecule and lots of hydrogen molecules and text appears: Hydrogen]

Narrator: Our energy system is evolving and one of the sustainable solutions that can keep us powering ahead is hydrogen, the most abundant element in the universe.

[Image moves up and off the top of the screen and a nitrogen molecule appears surrounded by hydrogen molecules]

But hydrogen is difficult to store and transport. Ammonia contains 70% more hydrogen per volume than liquid hydrogen.

[Animation image zooms out and then the animation image changes to show a fuel bowser with a “H” sign on the front of it]

It’s also an inexpensive and efficient way to store and transport hydrogen.

[Animation image changes to show three test tubes in a rack and the image shows two of the test tubes being removed from the rack by hands]

Researchers at the CSIRO can now separate high purity hydrogen from the nitrogen in ammonia.

[Animation image changes to show groups of hydrogen and nitrogen molecules moving across the screen]

The ammonia molecule can be decomposed into a mixture of nitrogen and hydrogen gas.

[Animation image changes to show the hydrogen molecules moving through the metal membrane in the middle of the screen and then animation images flash through of a car, a bus and a truck]

Using CSIRO’s metal membrane technology, the hydrogen is then extracted at ultra high purity right where it is needed and can then be dispensed into fuel cell cars, buses and even trucks.

[Animation image changes to show a world globe spinning]

This could enable large scale, renewable hydrogen production for use in Australia and all over the world.

[Animation image changes to show an experiment using beakers and test tubes and then the image rotates and morphs into two hydrogen molecules]

CSIRO is investing in research that will help ensure hydrogen has a role to play in our energy future.

[Music plays the CSIRO logo and text appears: CSIRO Australia’s innovation catalyst, www.csiro.au/energy]

Powering ahead with our hydrogen membrane technology

With our recent advances in hydrogen membrane technology, hydrogen can now be extracted at ultra-high purity from ammonia at the point of need – then dispensed into fuel cell vehicles. This technology will enable large-scale renewable hydrogen production within Australia and globally.

Watch more

[Music plays and animation images move through of a factory, two windmills, solar panels on a house roof, a battery, a hydrogen molecule and lots of hydrogen molecules and text appears: Hydrogen]

Narrator: Our energy system is evolving and one of the sustainable solutions that can keep us powering ahead is hydrogen, the most abundant element in the universe.

[Image moves up and off the top of the screen and a nitrogen molecule appears surrounded by hydrogen molecules]

But hydrogen is difficult to store and transport. Ammonia contains 70% more hydrogen per volume than liquid hydrogen.

[Animation image zooms out and then the animation image changes to show a fuel bowser with a “H” sign on the front of it]

It’s also an inexpensive and efficient way to store and transport hydrogen.

[Animation image changes to show three test tubes in a rack and the image shows two of the test tubes being removed from the rack by hands]

Researchers at the CSIRO can now separate high purity hydrogen from the nitrogen in ammonia.

[Animation image changes to show groups of hydrogen and nitrogen molecules moving across the screen]

The ammonia molecule can be decomposed into a mixture of nitrogen and hydrogen gas.

[Animation image changes to show the hydrogen molecules moving through the metal membrane in the middle of the screen and then animation images flash through of a car, a bus and a truck]

Using CSIRO’s metal membrane technology, the hydrogen is then extracted at ultra high purity right where it is needed and can then be dispensed into fuel cell cars, buses and even trucks.

[Animation image changes to show a world globe spinning]

This could enable large scale, renewable hydrogen production for use in Australia and all over the world.

[Animation image changes to show an experiment using beakers and test tubes and then the image rotates and morphs into two hydrogen molecules]

CSIRO is investing in research that will help ensure hydrogen has a role to play in our energy future.

[Music plays the CSIRO logo and text appears: CSIRO Australia’s innovation catalyst, www.csiro.au/energy]

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