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A broccoli latte surrounded by bunches of raw broccoli

Broccoli: better latte than never

You’ve seen the turmeric latte and the latte served in an avocado but could the broccoli latte be the next coffee trend?

Drink your vegetables
A broccoli latte surrounded by bunches of raw broccoli

Interronauts: The CSIRO podcast

Interronauts | Episode 13: Broccoli lattes, robot ecologists, and a new hope against the feline menace

This episode, Sarah Frazer joins the roster to talk about our robot ecologists in the Amazon, the plan to augment feral cats into all-male clowders, the use of ugly veggies into delightful powders for your coffee, and researchers' best attempt yet at weighing all life on Earth.

Tune in to more

Video

[Music plays and the CSIRO logo appears]

[Music plays and an image of the entrance to the Genomics Division appears and text appears on the door: Genomics and Epigenetics Research Division]

[Image changes to show model pathogen data on a computer screen and then the image changes to show Sean O’Donoghue talking to the camera and text appears: Sean O’Donoghue, Senior Principal Research Scientist]

Sean O’Donoghue: So, my name is Sean O’Donoghue. I work at CSIRO’s Data 61 and I also work at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research.

[Image changes to show the side of the Garvan Institute of Medical Research building]

So, on a team that’s using advanced data computation to advance medical research.

[Image changes to show a computer animation of the Norovirus on a screen and then the image changes to show Sean O’Donoghue talking to the camera]

So, we’re partnering with Vivid Sydney this year to create an installation.

[Image changes to show Leo Herson talking to the camera and text appears: Leo Herson, Biomedical Animator]

Leo Herson: It’s going to be an incredibly colourful animation depicting viruses and bacteria.

[Image changes to show a side view of Leo working on a computer]

So, some you might have encountered in your day to day life, some you might not have and it really gives people an idea and sense of scale and what they actually look like.

[Image changes to show Leo and Sean looking at two computer screens and conversing and then the camera zooms in on the two screens depicting the Norovirus on one and a building on the other]

Sean O’Donoghue: Things like HIV, but even more mundane things like influenza and we’re going to blow them up to about a billion times so people can actually experience them in a new way.

[Image changes to show a rear view of Sean looking at and pointing to the computer screen]

And we’re also going to show their entire genetic information and some basic information about them as well.

[Image changes to show Sean talking to the camera and then the image changes to show an animation model of a virus spinning around on a computer screen]

In a work like this there’s a struggle to get the science right and that’s something that we’re very concerned about, making sure that what we show you is really directly taken from solid experimental evidence.

[Image changes to show Leo talking to the camera]

Leo Herson: People don’t realise that science and design can go hand in hand.

[Image changes to show Leo working on a laptop and creating models and then the image changes to show an animation model of a coloured virus on a screen]

Well, the way that I worked with colour was that I used a lot of pastels, blues and reds, you know, very, very toned down.

[Image changes to show Sean and Leo working on a laptop and looking at two computer screens]

Throwing me into Vivid means that you’ve got to really boost up the saturation for a lot of your models.

[Image shows Sean and Leo in conversation and then the image changes to show Leo talking to the camera]

And that was the hardest thing for me, was coming to terms with my models being bright pink, neon pink.

[Image changes to show Sean standing outside a building and talking to the camera]

Sean O’Donoghue: Come and experience the pathogens that cause some of the big problems in human society see them in a way that you’ve never seen them before.

[Music plays and the CSIRO logo and text appears: Australia’s innovation catalyst, csiro.au/vividsydney]

Behind the scences with our Vivid Sydney animators

This year we’re collaborating with Vivid Sydney and the Garvan Institute of Medical Research to give you a close up and personal encounter with the infectious biological agents that most affect human health – magnified to spectacular scale. Come behind the scenes to see the creators behind our installation that is a combination of art and lifesaving science.

Watch more

[Music plays and the CSIRO logo appears]

[Music plays and an image of the entrance to the Genomics Division appears and text appears on the door: Genomics and Epigenetics Research Division]

[Image changes to show model pathogen data on a computer screen and then the image changes to show Sean O’Donoghue talking to the camera and text appears: Sean O’Donoghue, Senior Principal Research Scientist]

Sean O’Donoghue: So, my name is Sean O’Donoghue. I work at CSIRO’s Data 61 and I also work at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research.

[Image changes to show the side of the Garvan Institute of Medical Research building]

So, on a team that’s using advanced data computation to advance medical research.

[Image changes to show a computer animation of the Norovirus on a screen and then the image changes to show Sean O’Donoghue talking to the camera]

So, we’re partnering with Vivid Sydney this year to create an installation.

[Image changes to show Leo Herson talking to the camera and text appears: Leo Herson, Biomedical Animator]

Leo Herson: It’s going to be an incredibly colourful animation depicting viruses and bacteria.

[Image changes to show a side view of Leo working on a computer]

So, some you might have encountered in your day to day life, some you might not have and it really gives people an idea and sense of scale and what they actually look like.

[Image changes to show Leo and Sean looking at two computer screens and conversing and then the camera zooms in on the two screens depicting the Norovirus on one and a building on the other]

Sean O’Donoghue: Things like HIV, but even more mundane things like influenza and we’re going to blow them up to about a billion times so people can actually experience them in a new way.

[Image changes to show a rear view of Sean looking at and pointing to the computer screen]

And we’re also going to show their entire genetic information and some basic information about them as well.

[Image changes to show Sean talking to the camera and then the image changes to show an animation model of a virus spinning around on a computer screen]

In a work like this there’s a struggle to get the science right and that’s something that we’re very concerned about, making sure that what we show you is really directly taken from solid experimental evidence.

[Image changes to show Leo talking to the camera]

Leo Herson: People don’t realise that science and design can go hand in hand.

[Image changes to show Leo working on a laptop and creating models and then the image changes to show an animation model of a coloured virus on a screen]

Well, the way that I worked with colour was that I used a lot of pastels, blues and reds, you know, very, very toned down.

[Image changes to show Sean and Leo working on a laptop and looking at two computer screens]

Throwing me into Vivid means that you’ve got to really boost up the saturation for a lot of your models.

[Image shows Sean and Leo in conversation and then the image changes to show Leo talking to the camera]

And that was the hardest thing for me, was coming to terms with my models being bright pink, neon pink.

[Image changes to show Sean standing outside a building and talking to the camera]

Sean O’Donoghue: Come and experience the pathogens that cause some of the big problems in human society see them in a way that you’ve never seen them before.

[Music plays and the CSIRO logo and text appears: Australia’s innovation catalyst, csiro.au/vividsydney]

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