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Interronauts: The CSIRO podcast

Interronauts | Episode 12: Elephant scarecrow, the OG, Adam & Eve of flowers, tarantula venom to save sheep, and Interronauts farewell

Well listeners, this is it for a little bit — Season One of Interronauts is over. In our last episode, we've got new technology from CSIRO: giving scarecrows a brain, we've got the evolution of the first flower ever (what!?), we've got more research on how tarantula venom can help treat enwormed sheep, and plenty more science shenanigans. (Don't forget to listen back through our back catalogue!)

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Video

[Music plays as the camera pans over lush foliage that is running alongside a flowing river]

[Image changes to show a female with a platypus draped over each arm. Text appears: In 2010 scientists discovered that platypus milk contains unique antibacterial properties that could be used to fight superbugs.]

[Image changes to show a female with half her body submerged in water, a platypus runs along her arms and falls into the water]

[Image changes to show the platypus swimming in the water]

[Image changes to show an outside shot of a CSIRO facility. Text appears: Now, a team of our researchers, working with Deakin University have brought platypus milk one step closer to being used to save lives.]

[Image changes to show a male working inside a laboratory type setting, placing a small tray inside a piece of scientific equipment]

[Image changes to show data on a computer monitor. Text appears: Using the marvel of molecular biology, we have made platypus milk protein in the lab and examined its structure & characteristics.]

[Image changes back to show a platypus swimming in a body of water. Text appears: The platypus belongs to the monotreme family, a small group of mammals that lay eggs and produce milk for their young.]

[Image changes back to show the female with half her body submerged in water and a platypus crawling on her back. Text appears: They are such weird animals that it makes sense for them to have weird biochemistry.]

[Image changes to show a computer generated picture of a protein molecule. Text appears: Working in our Collaborative Crystallisation Centre we discovered a unique ringlet-like structure in the protein.]

[Image changes to show a photo of Shirley Temple. Text appears: We named this never-before-seen structure the “Shirley Temple” fold after the child actor’s ringlets.]

[Image changes back to show the computer generated picture of a protein molecule. Text appears: This is the first time a protein structure like this has been found identifying monotremes as a source of novel proteins.]

[Image changes back to show a man in a laboratory type setting, viewing something through a microscope. Text appears: The discovery increases our knowledge of protein structures in general and will inform other drug discovery work done at the Centre]

[Image changes to show a scientific sample processor in action. Text appears: potentially paving the way for this protein’s use in antibacterial dressings and topical creams to treat infections.]

[Image changes to show the same male removing samples and placing them on a table. Text appears: Our Collaborative Crystallisation Centre (C3) is one of the best facilities of its kind in the world with expertise in drug discovery and bio-industry applications.]

[Image changes to show the camera panning over bottled samples on shelves]

[Music plays and CSIRO logo appears on screen with text: Australia’s innovation catalyst]

[Credits appear in the top left of screen: Thanks to Zoos Victoria for Platypus footage]

Fighting superbugs with platypus milk and Shirley Temple

Monotremes like echidna and platypus are highly unusual creatures, and as it turns out, so are the proteins in their milk.

Watch more

[Music plays as the camera pans over lush foliage that is running alongside a flowing river]

[Image changes to show a female with a platypus draped over each arm. Text appears: In 2010 scientists discovered that platypus milk contains unique antibacterial properties that could be used to fight superbugs.]

[Image changes to show a female with half her body submerged in water, a platypus runs along her arms and falls into the water]

[Image changes to show the platypus swimming in the water]

[Image changes to show an outside shot of a CSIRO facility. Text appears: Now, a team of our researchers, working with Deakin University have brought platypus milk one step closer to being used to save lives.]

[Image changes to show a male working inside a laboratory type setting, placing a small tray inside a piece of scientific equipment]

[Image changes to show data on a computer monitor. Text appears: Using the marvel of molecular biology, we have made platypus milk protein in the lab and examined its structure & characteristics.]

[Image changes back to show a platypus swimming in a body of water. Text appears: The platypus belongs to the monotreme family, a small group of mammals that lay eggs and produce milk for their young.]

[Image changes back to show the female with half her body submerged in water and a platypus crawling on her back. Text appears: They are such weird animals that it makes sense for them to have weird biochemistry.]

[Image changes to show a computer generated picture of a protein molecule. Text appears: Working in our Collaborative Crystallisation Centre we discovered a unique ringlet-like structure in the protein.]

[Image changes to show a photo of Shirley Temple. Text appears: We named this never-before-seen structure the “Shirley Temple” fold after the child actor’s ringlets.]

[Image changes back to show the computer generated picture of a protein molecule. Text appears: This is the first time a protein structure like this has been found identifying monotremes as a source of novel proteins.]

[Image changes back to show a man in a laboratory type setting, viewing something through a microscope. Text appears: The discovery increases our knowledge of protein structures in general and will inform other drug discovery work done at the Centre]

[Image changes to show a scientific sample processor in action. Text appears: potentially paving the way for this protein’s use in antibacterial dressings and topical creams to treat infections.]

[Image changes to show the same male removing samples and placing them on a table. Text appears: Our Collaborative Crystallisation Centre (C3) is one of the best facilities of its kind in the world with expertise in drug discovery and bio-industry applications.]

[Image changes to show the camera panning over bottled samples on shelves]

[Music plays and CSIRO logo appears on screen with text: Australia’s innovation catalyst]

[Credits appear in the top left of screen: Thanks to Zoos Victoria for Platypus footage]

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