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The pest is history! Put your knowledge to the test

Do you know your rabbits from your 'river rabbits'? What does lantana look like? Take our biocontrol quiz and put your pesty knowledge to the test!

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Interronauts: The CSIRO podcast

Ep 23: Cat food vs. big-headed ants, autonomous cave bots, Elizabeth and Fast Radio Bursts, and bye bye for now

This episode Jesse and Harry talk ants and tech: our phenomenally successful eradication of African big-headed ants from Lord Howe Island. They also chat about autonomous cave-exploring droids and speak with star researcher Dr Elizabeth Mahony about interstellar radio explosions.

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Video

[Music plays and image shows fish swimming through reef coral. Text appears: Not all starfish are the stuff of fairy tales]

[Image shows several crown of thorns starfish on bleached coral, and text appears: The Crown-of-Thorns Starfish eats coral,]

[Image shows an aerial view of the Great Barrier Reef and text appears: making it a major threat to the Great Barrier Reef.]

[Image shows a diver injecting a starfish, and text appears: But scientists have discovered the starfish’s kryptonite.]

[Image shows the diver pushing aside starfish, and text appears: And it’s something you have in your kitchen cupboard…]

[Image shows two divers]

[Image shows a starfish being injected and text appears: Divers are injecting the Crown-of-Thorns Starfish with vinegar.]

[Image shows starfish being turned over with a hook, and text appears: It’s one of the ways we’re helping control this menace of the Reef.]

[Image shows three divers injecting starfish, and text appears: And we’re working with a stellar team of starfish busters]

[Image shows a group of people standing on a dock around a dead starfish and text appears: including Indigenous trainees, tourism operators, researchers and policy makers.]

[Image shows brightly coloured coral and fish, and text appears: Together, we’re helping bring colour back to the Reef.]

[Image shows orange fish swimming through green coral]

[Text appears: Visit blog.csiro.au for the full story. Footage: Reef Restoration & Adaptation Program, Reef & Rainforest Research Centre]

[CSIRO logo appears and text appears: Australia’s innovation catalyst]

Vinegar: A secret weapon in the fight against crown-of-thorns starfish

The crown-of-thorns starfish eats massive amounts of coral on the Great Barrier Reef. We're working with an all-star team to control this menace of the Reef.

Watch more

[Music plays and image shows fish swimming through reef coral. Text appears: Not all starfish are the stuff of fairy tales]

[Image shows several crown of thorns starfish on bleached coral, and text appears: The Crown-of-Thorns Starfish eats coral,]

[Image shows an aerial view of the Great Barrier Reef and text appears: making it a major threat to the Great Barrier Reef.]

[Image shows a diver injecting a starfish, and text appears: But scientists have discovered the starfish’s kryptonite.]

[Image shows the diver pushing aside starfish, and text appears: And it’s something you have in your kitchen cupboard…]

[Image shows two divers]

[Image shows a starfish being injected and text appears: Divers are injecting the Crown-of-Thorns Starfish with vinegar.]

[Image shows starfish being turned over with a hook, and text appears: It’s one of the ways we’re helping control this menace of the Reef.]

[Image shows three divers injecting starfish, and text appears: And we’re working with a stellar team of starfish busters]

[Image shows a group of people standing on a dock around a dead starfish and text appears: including Indigenous trainees, tourism operators, researchers and policy makers.]

[Image shows brightly coloured coral and fish, and text appears: Together, we’re helping bring colour back to the Reef.]

[Image shows orange fish swimming through green coral]

[Text appears: Visit blog.csiro.au for the full story. Footage: Reef Restoration & Adaptation Program, Reef & Rainforest Research Centre]

[CSIRO logo appears and text appears: Australia’s innovation catalyst]

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