Science in focus

Latest

A Honeybee collecting pollen on a flower

Featured

Can you beelieve?! Our guide to native bees

European honeybees are beloved, yet our very own beautiful native bees don't get much attention. It's time to get to know our fuzzy friends a bit better and go on a wild native bee-hunting ride.

Sound sweet?
A Honeybee collecting pollen on a flower

Interronauts: The CSIRO podcast

Ep 21: Science of indecision, helping endangered fish with hands and saws for faces

Jesse and Sarah discuss indecision, a tiny imperilled handfish, Australia's roadmap towards a future in space, and they chat with our researcher Dr Rich Pillans about the seven metre leviathan: the largetooth sawfish.

Tune in to more

Video

[Music plays and an image appears of a Fast Radio Burst in a galaxy]

[Image changes to show blobs of colour trailing coloured wavy lines and moving across the screen in front of the night sky]

[Camera zooms in on the colours until only the purple blob can be seen and then the camera pans in an anticlockwise direction so the purple blob is moving towards a world globe]

[Camera zooms in on the world globe and a kaleidoscope of colours can be seen covering the screen]

[Image changes to show the blobs of colour trailing wavy lines moving across the screen again across a night sky]

[Image changes to show the purple blob heading towards the world globe and the background changes to a brilliant yellow colour]

[Image changes to show the blobs of colour trailing wavy lines moving across the screen again and the screen continues to show a flashing yellow background]

[Image continues to show the blobs of colour trailing wavy lines behind them moving through the night sky again]

[Image changes to show the purple blob heading towards the world globe and the background changes to a brilliant pink colour]

[Image changes to show the blobs of colour trailing wavy lines moving across the screen again and the screen and the screen shows a pink and blue background flashing by]

[Image continues to show the blobs of colour trailing wavy lines behind them moving through the night sky again]

[Image changes to show the top of the purple blob heading through a galaxy and then towards a bright light which gradually morphs into a world globe showing Australia on its face]

[Camera zooms in on Australia and then in again to show an aerial view of the ASKAP array]

[Camera pans in an anticlockwise direction over the ASKAP array and then the image changes to show the blobs of colour hitting one of the satellite dishes in the ASKAP array]

[Camera continues to pan in an anticlockwise direction and coloured lines can be seen moving down the telescope]

[Image changes to show an aerial view of the ASKAP array and coloured lines can be seen moving from one of the telescopes and feeding down in a straight line to the inside of the buildings at the centre of the ASKAP array]

[Image changes to show the inside of the building at the ASKAP array and banks of computers can be seen either side of a room and coloured lines can be seen travelling along these banks of computers and into a computer screen on a desk at the front of the room]

[Camera zooms in to show a multi coloured curved line on the computer screen at the front of the room and then the camera zooms back out again]

[Images flash through of an aerial view of the ASKAP array buildings, Australia on the globe and the globe in the night sky again]

[Image shows the globe becoming a point of light which gradually disappears amongst the night sky]

[Image changes to show a large galaxy in the night sky and then the image shows smaller galaxies in a row to the left of the large galaxy and a line can be seen drawn through all of the galaxies]

[Music plays and the CSIRO, ICRAR, OzGrav and Swinburne logos appear]

An FRB’s journey to Earth

A fast radio burst leaves a distant galaxy, travelling to Earth over billions of years and occasionally passing through clouds of gas in its path. Each time a cloud of gas is encountered, the different wavelengths that make up a burst are slowed by different amounts. Timing the arrival of the different wavelengths at a radio telescope tells us how much material the burst has travelled through on its way to Earth and allows astronomers to to detect "missing" matter located in the space between galaxies.

Watch more

[Music plays and an image appears of a Fast Radio Burst in a galaxy]

[Image changes to show blobs of colour trailing coloured wavy lines and moving across the screen in front of the night sky]

[Camera zooms in on the colours until only the purple blob can be seen and then the camera pans in an anticlockwise direction so the purple blob is moving towards a world globe]

[Camera zooms in on the world globe and a kaleidoscope of colours can be seen covering the screen]

[Image changes to show the blobs of colour trailing wavy lines moving across the screen again across a night sky]

[Image changes to show the purple blob heading towards the world globe and the background changes to a brilliant yellow colour]

[Image changes to show the blobs of colour trailing wavy lines moving across the screen again and the screen continues to show a flashing yellow background]

[Image continues to show the blobs of colour trailing wavy lines behind them moving through the night sky again]

[Image changes to show the purple blob heading towards the world globe and the background changes to a brilliant pink colour]

[Image changes to show the blobs of colour trailing wavy lines moving across the screen again and the screen and the screen shows a pink and blue background flashing by]

[Image continues to show the blobs of colour trailing wavy lines behind them moving through the night sky again]

[Image changes to show the top of the purple blob heading through a galaxy and then towards a bright light which gradually morphs into a world globe showing Australia on its face]

[Camera zooms in on Australia and then in again to show an aerial view of the ASKAP array]

[Camera pans in an anticlockwise direction over the ASKAP array and then the image changes to show the blobs of colour hitting one of the satellite dishes in the ASKAP array]

[Camera continues to pan in an anticlockwise direction and coloured lines can be seen moving down the telescope]

[Image changes to show an aerial view of the ASKAP array and coloured lines can be seen moving from one of the telescopes and feeding down in a straight line to the inside of the buildings at the centre of the ASKAP array]

[Image changes to show the inside of the building at the ASKAP array and banks of computers can be seen either side of a room and coloured lines can be seen travelling along these banks of computers and into a computer screen on a desk at the front of the room]

[Camera zooms in to show a multi coloured curved line on the computer screen at the front of the room and then the camera zooms back out again]

[Images flash through of an aerial view of the ASKAP array buildings, Australia on the globe and the globe in the night sky again]

[Image shows the globe becoming a point of light which gradually disappears amongst the night sky]

[Image changes to show a large galaxy in the night sky and then the image shows smaller galaxies in a row to the left of the large galaxy and a line can be seen drawn through all of the galaxies]

[Music plays and the CSIRO, ICRAR, OzGrav and Swinburne logos appear]

Got a sticky beak for science?

Get all the latest science news delivered straight to your inbox, in whatever way suits you.